GDPR News Center News for 10-17-2018

Achieving GDPR compliance in the cloud with Microsoft Azure

The General Data Protection Regulation officially goes into effect on May 25. Very soon, the GDPR will replace the Data Protection Directive as the new global standard on data privacy for all government agencies and organizations that do business with European Union citizens. When it does, all organizations that control, maintain, or process information involving EU citizens will be required to comply with strict new rules regarding the protection of personal customer data. For companies that store and manage data in the cloud, assuming existing infrastructure will remain compliant with new regulatory requirements might result in significant fines. It’s important to understand that the differences between the new GDPR and the Data Protection Directive could impact your cloud data and security controls. 

More than ever, this regulatory transition highlights the importance of implementing a comprehensive cloud security strategy for your company. According to a recent GDPR benchmarking survey, although 89 percent of organizations have a formal GDPR-readiness program, only 45 percent have completed a readiness assessment. At Microsoft, we’ve been preparing for GDPR compliance for the better part of a year and empowering our customers to do the same. Because Microsoft has extensive experience developing cloud solutions with security built-in, we’ve become a leading voice on solving GDPR-related privacy challenges in the cloud. Now, we’ve turned this experience and insight into a free, four-part video series, Countdown: Preparing for GDPR. 

Be sure to watch GDPR and Azure to learn more from David Burt, Senior Compliance Marketing Manager for Azure. 

Keywords: [“Data”,”GDPR”,”cloud”]
Source: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/achieving-gdpr-compliance-in-the-cloud-with-microsoft-azure/

6 Key Steps to Ensure GDPR Compliance

Not everyone can be a GDPR compliance specialist, but that doesn’t mean you should ignore data protection and privacy; especially if you run a business. In most cases, there are different levels of key personnel that interact with customers’ data and therefore should be aware of the General Data Protection Regulation. Data processor – the entity that processes data on behalf of the Data Controller. An important step towards compliance with GDPR is to understand how data moves in your organization. Mapping the flow of data will also help you identify areas that could cause GDPR compliance problems. 

The GDPR is a business change project – the people you work with need to understand the importance of data protection and be trained on the basic principles of the GDPR and the procedures being implemented for compliance. Because GDPR has no clear-cut rules, the market will have to come up with different tactics to make sure that data is in compliance but not sacrifice user experience. Be smart while setting up the data breach matrix based on data breach severity, the number of data subjects affected, type of personal data affected, etc. You should review your procedures to ensure they cover all the rights individuals have, including how you would delete personal data or provide data electronically in a commonly used format. Verify if data transfers outside the EU are compliant with GDPR requirements. 

The GDPR will require some organizations to designate a Data Protection Officer. If your organization processes data from underage subjects, you must ensure that you have adequate systems in place to verify individual ages and gather consent from guardians. 

Keywords: [“data”,”GDPR”,”personal”]
Source: https://www.codeinwp.com/blog/gdpr-compliance/

6 Key Steps to Ensure GDPR Compliance

Not everyone can be a GDPR compliance specialist, but that doesn’t mean you should ignore data protection and privacy; especially if you run a business. In most cases, there are different levels of key personnel that interact with customers’ data and therefore should be aware of the General Data Protection Regulation. Data processor – the entity that processes data on behalf of the Data Controller. An important step towards compliance with GDPR is to understand how data moves in your organization. Mapping the flow of data will also help you identify areas that could cause GDPR compliance problems. 

The GDPR is a business change project – the people you work with need to understand the importance of data protection and be trained on the basic principles of the GDPR and the procedures being implemented for compliance. Because GDPR has no clear-cut rules, the market will have to come up with different tactics to make sure that data is in compliance but not sacrifice user experience. Be smart while setting up the data breach matrix based on data breach severity, the number of data subjects affected, type of personal data affected, etc. You should review your procedures to ensure they cover all the rights individuals have, including how you would delete personal data or provide data electronically in a commonly used format. Verify if data transfers outside the EU are compliant with GDPR requirements. 

The GDPR will require some organizations to designate a Data Protection Officer. If your organization processes data from underage subjects, you must ensure that you have adequate systems in place to verify individual ages and gather consent from guardians. 

Keywords: [“data”,”GDPR”,”personal”]
Source: https://www.codeinwp.com/blog/gdpr-compliance/

What is GDPR, and how does it affect me?

GDPR is intended to protect the privacy and personal data of European residents. That’s because the two-year transition period is ending, meaning that any organization that processes personal data of European residents will need to be compliant with these new regulations by May 25, 2018. These new GDPR rules set forth some stringent guidelines about how personal data may be collected, used, stored, protected, and shared with others. Personal Data is defined as any information that can be used to directly or indirectly identify a person. Mad Mimi is subject to the requirements of the GDPR because we process and store data about customers of ours that reside in the EU. 

These rules also apply to you, because you own contact lists and data about your email recipients. As the controller of that data, it’s your responsibility to make sure that data is being used in accordance with any and all applicable legal regulations, including GDPR. Although the law was adopted to protect European residents, it may still apply to your organization if you offer goods or services to, or monitor the behavior of, EU residents. Use certain levels of security to protect all stored personal data. Obtain consent to store and process personal data of our users. 

Keep records of what data we’ve stored and processed, and export or delete that data upon request. Obtain consent to store and process personal data of your customers and subscribers. Receive an export of all the data an organization stores about them. First, the recipient can write directly to you, the sender, and ask that their View and Click data not be tracked. 

Keywords: [“data”,”GDPR”,”any”]
Source: https://help.madmimi.com/what-is-gdpr-and-how-does-it-affect-me/

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