GDPR News Center News for 10-25-2018

EU GDPR Webinar: The IT Manager’s guide to GDPR – Getting your department up to speed and ready

GDPR Compliance

The regulation increases the level of control EEA citizens and residents have over their personal data in the new digital age and presents a more unified environment for international business across Europe. The Regulation impacts any business that receives, processes, stores or transfers personal data of EEA-based individuals, regardless of its location. Personal data is defined broadly and typically includes information relating to an individual such as name, email, location, online identifier, IP address, home address etc. New rights are given to individual data subjects concerning the personal data being stored, including the right prior notification of what data is being used for, how it will be processed and when it will be deleted. As a result, most businesses dealing the European market have had to review and update their data practices and privacy policies. 

BlueSnap & the GDPR. BlueSnap has been focused on completing its General Data Protection Regulation compliance efforts. To enable BlueSnap merchants to continue accepting orders from individuals based in the European Economic Area from that date onwards, the GDPR compels us to put into effect a Data Protection agreement containing mandatory provisions for all merchants wherever they are based. We therefore issued a Data Protection Addendum effective for BlueSnap and all merchants as from 25th May 2018. Review the new Data Protection Addendum here: https://home. 

In order to cover the aspect of data transfer from the European Economic Area to the US, BlueSnap has been certified on Privacy Shield since Q3 2016. We also added certification under the Swiss-US Privacy Shield scheme in 2017 and are currently finalizing updated data processing agreements with relevant parties involved in the processing, receipt, and storage of personal data. We strongly advise merchants that receive shopper details from EEA-based individuals to take immediate steps to ensure their own data management practices are in compliance with the GDPR, and that other third party services used in addition to BlueSnap, are also compliant. 

Keywords: [“data”,”BlueSnap”,”individual”]
Source: https://home.bluesnap.com/gdpr-compliance/

‘Everyone is breaking the law right now’: GDPR compliance efforts are falling short

The arrival of the General Data Protection Regulation a month ago led to a flurry of activity, clogging email inboxes and flooding people with tracking consent notices. Experts say much of that activity was for show because much of it fails to render companies compliant with GDPR. Part of the issue, experts say, is the vague regulation has been interpreted in wildly different ways. GDPR consent-request messages vary wildly across sites. There are default pre-ticked opt-ins, buried options that require users to hunt for them, consent banners with information only available at a further click but no button to reject, and implied consent approaches. 

Others have simply reskinned cookie-banner messages required under the existing ePrivacy directive. A tumultuous few weeks after the law’s arrival on May 25, in which programmatic ad volumes plummeted mostly as a result of Google’s last-minute GDPR policy changes, programmatic spending is returning to pre-GDPR levels. GDPR has been criticized for being vague and open to interpretation, which is what led to such disparate consent-gaining methods. Publishers across Europe are divided between those that have taken softer legitimate interest-based approaches or opt-out methods to claim compliance, while others have gone the harder consent-based route that requires people to opt in. Bloomberg and Forbes appear to be taking strict active consent approaches, while others like the Guardian and MailOnline are running consent banners. 

Several publishers have divided explainers on their cookie use into those used for advertising and tracking, and those used for site analytics – though users aren’t always able to pick one and reject the other; in many cases, it’s all or nothing. Others are simply hoping to stay under the radar until they have figured out how to be compliant in a way that doesn’t damage the business model. Publishers went on a soul-searching mission when ad blocking reached crisis levels in 2017. 

Keywords: [“publishers”,”consent”,”GDPR”]
Source: https://digiday.com/media/everyone-breaking-law-right-now-gdpr-compliance-efforts-falling-short/

80 Percent of Companies Still Not GDPR-Compliant

Several weeks after the deadline for General Data Protection Regulation compliance, the vast majority of companies are either still working on it or have yet to begin the process. That’s according to the latest research from TrustArc, which surveyed 600 IT and legal professionals responsible for privacy at companies required to meet GDPR compliance in the United States, the United Kingdom and the European Union – one month following the May 25. Only one in five companies surveyed believe it is GDPR compliant, while 53 percent are in the implementation phase and 27 percent have not yet started their implementation. EU companies, excluding the U.K., are further along, with 27 percent reporting they are compliant, versus 12 percent in the U.S. and 21 percent in the U.K. 

While many companies have significant work to do, nearly three in four expect to be compliant by the end of this year and 93 percent by the end of 2019. While many companies still have a long way to go, a comparison to August 2017. About one in four companies spent more than $500,000 to become GDPR-compliant, while one in three plan to spend that amount on compliance efforts between June and December 2018. Percent of U.S. companies spent more than $1 million on compliance vx. 10 percent for U.K. 

and 7 percent for EU companies. Despite difficulties in becoming GDPR-compliant, 65 percent view GDPR as having a positive impact on their business, while 15 percent view the regulation as having a negative impact. Meeting customer expectations was the main driver to become compliant, much higher than concern for fines. Complexity of GDPR posed the biggest challenge to compliance. The vast majority said data privacy will become more important at their companies post-GDPR deadline, and 80 percent of companies plan to increase their spending on GDPR technology and tools to maintain compliance. 

Keywords: [“percent”,”companies”,”compliance”]
Source: https://www.channelpartnersonline.com/2018/07/13/80-percent-of-companies-still-not-gdpr-compliant/

GDPR News Center News for 10-13-2018

GDPR Compliance for 2018: It’s easier than you think

It’s the date that the European General Data Protection Regulation is set to go into effect. The new legislation is intended to offer consumers more protection for how businesses handle their personal data. Personal data also applies to any data that, when processed along with additional data or alone, could identify a specific individual. Who is a Data ControllerA natural or legal person or entity, who alone or with others, determines how personal data is, or will be, processed. Who is a Data ProcessorA natural or legal person or entity charged with the processing of personal data on behalf of a data controller. 

For the purposes of data you collected using ShortStack, you would be considered the data controller and ShortStack is the data processor. There may be other cases when you are working with individuals’ personal data in which case you would be the data processor. Individuals or businesses not located within the EU, but who are considered processors or controllers of the personal data of individuals located in the EU;. Individuals and businesses located in countries whose data protection laws are set to change alongside the GDPR – examples include the United Kingdom’s proposed Data Protection Bill, Switzerland’s updates to the Swiss Data Protection Act, and Norway’s new Personal Data Act;. You must provide individuals with information regarding how their data will be used. 

Under the GDPR, you are considered a Data Controller, while ShortStack is the Data Processor. For the most part, the GDPR only affects folks located within Europe or those processing the personal data of individuals located within Europe. While staying compliant with the GDPR is important if you are located within the EU or processing the personal data of individuals located in the EU, when you use ShortStack, it isn’t difficult to comply with the requirements. 

Keywords: [“Data”,”email”,”individual”]
Source: https://www.shortstack.com/blog/gdpr-compliance-its-easier-than-you-think/

How Raygun Is Handling GDPR Compliance

Overview The General Data Protection Regulation is a new set of rules designed to give EU citizens more control over their personal data. Raygun is committed to GDPR compliance across all products and services. We are also committed to helping our customers with their GDPR compliance journey by providing robust privacy and security protections built into our services and contracts. Protecting your data As a Raygun customer, your data will be treated in accordance with the GDPR legislation. Security of our customers’ data is our number one priority, and Raygun has already obtained approval from EU data protection authorities, to enable transfer of data outside Europe, including to the U.S. 

Raygun customers can continue to run their global operations using Raygun in full compliance with EU law. The Raygun Data Processing Addendum is available to all Raygun customers that are processing personal data whether they are established in Europe or a global company operating in the European Economic Area. Raygun has appointed a Data Protection Officer where such appointment is required by Data Protection Laws and Regulations. Compliance Raygun will be implementing tools for administrators in your account settings to ensure they comply with GDPR and EU law before the legislation comes into effect on 25 May 2018. Raygun account owners will have the functionality to agree and sign the Data Processing Addendum between Raygun and your organization from within your account settings. 

All Raygun providers offer the ability to exclude specific and sensitive information before being sent for us to process. Some Raygun features allow you to send IP address information, email addresses, usernames and other custom data to assist with issue diagnosis. Raygun does not collect this information by default. 

Keywords: [“Data”,”Raygun”,”GDPR”]
Source: https://raygun.com/gdpr

How Raygun Is Handling GDPR Compliance

Overview The General Data Protection Regulation is a new set of rules designed to give EU citizens more control over their personal data. Raygun is committed to GDPR compliance across all products and services. We are also committed to helping our customers with their GDPR compliance journey by providing robust privacy and security protections built into our services and contracts. Protecting your data As a Raygun customer, your data will be treated in accordance with the GDPR legislation. Security of our customers’ data is our number one priority, and Raygun has already obtained approval from EU data protection authorities, to enable transfer of data outside Europe, including to the U.S. 

Raygun customers can continue to run their global operations using Raygun in full compliance with EU law. The Raygun Data Processing Addendum is available to all Raygun customers that are processing personal data whether they are established in Europe or a global company operating in the European Economic Area. Raygun has appointed a Data Protection Officer where such appointment is required by Data Protection Laws and Regulations. Compliance Raygun will be implementing tools for administrators in your account settings to ensure they comply with GDPR and EU law before the legislation comes into effect on 25 May 2018. Raygun account owners will have the functionality to agree and sign the Data Processing Addendum between Raygun and your organization from within your account settings. 

All Raygun providers offer the ability to exclude specific and sensitive information before being sent for us to process. Some Raygun features allow you to send IP address information, email addresses, usernames and other custom data to assist with issue diagnosis. Raygun does not collect this information by default. 

Keywords: [“Data”,”Raygun”,”GDPR”]
Source: https://raygun.com/gdpr

GDPR News Center News for 10-12-2018

GDPR compliant? Here’s a handy five-step preparation checklist

There is no lack of content and information about General Data Protection Regulation out there, but most marketing professionals I spoke with about the regulation were confused about what GDPR is or how they should prepare their marketing programs, website, and data collection process before the enforcement date, May 25, 2018. Marketing departments are also often responsible for communicating with stakeholders after a data breach. Create a custom GDPR preparation checklist taking appropriate recommendations from the list below. The primary marketing data lead should work closely as part of a data governance team with the DPO to review and approve marketing campaigns with European contacts before execution. Document all the data collection channels and steps: Document all the channels from which the marketing department receives contact data such as events, website registrations, partners, sales, list purchases, etc. 

Create an age-verification process: GDPR requires parental consent to collect or process the personal data of children under the age of 16. If collecting personal data in person, such as at an event, for a testimonial video or at an in-store sign-up, ask for consent and include a check box or other field for the person to check or initial when the individual has agreed to be emailed. Then the IP address is covered under GDPR personal data. Constellation reminds marketers that the predecessor to GDPR, the EU Data Protection Directive, is still active and, under the threat of fines, it prohibits emailing individuals who previously unsubscribed. GDPR requires organizations to report data breaches no later than 72 hours after the organization becomes aware of the breach. 

Constellation advises CMOs to be proactive and design a data breach action plan as a precaution. The following are recommended best practices for marketers responding to a data breach. 

Keywords: [“data”,”GDPR”,”marketing”]
Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/the-five-step-gdpr-preparation-checklist-for-marketing-organizations/

GDPR compliant? Here’s a handy five-step preparation checklist

There is no lack of content and information about General Data Protection Regulation out there, but most marketing professionals I spoke with about the regulation were confused about what GDPR is or how they should prepare their marketing programs, website, and data collection process before the enforcement date, May 25, 2018. Marketing departments are also often responsible for communicating with stakeholders after a data breach. Create a custom GDPR preparation checklist taking appropriate recommendations from the list below. The primary marketing data lead should work closely as part of a data governance team with the DPO to review and approve marketing campaigns with European contacts before execution. Document all the data collection channels and steps: Document all the channels from which the marketing department receives contact data such as events, website registrations, partners, sales, list purchases, etc. 

Create an age-verification process: GDPR requires parental consent to collect or process the personal data of children under the age of 16. If collecting personal data in person, such as at an event, for a testimonial video or at an in-store sign-up, ask for consent and include a check box or other field for the person to check or initial when the individual has agreed to be emailed. Then the IP address is covered under GDPR personal data. Constellation reminds marketers that the predecessor to GDPR, the EU Data Protection Directive, is still active and, under the threat of fines, it prohibits emailing individuals who previously unsubscribed. GDPR requires organizations to report data breaches no later than 72 hours after the organization becomes aware of the breach. 

Constellation advises CMOs to be proactive and design a data breach action plan as a precaution. The following are recommended best practices for marketers responding to a data breach. 

Keywords: [“data”,”GDPR”,”marketing”]
Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/the-five-step-gdpr-preparation-checklist-for-marketing-organizations/

GDPR Compliance for 2018: It’s easier than you think

It’s the date that the European General Data Protection Regulation is set to go into effect. The new legislation is intended to offer consumers more protection for how businesses handle their personal data. Personal data also applies to any data that, when processed along with additional data or alone, could identify a specific individual. Who is a Data ControllerA natural or legal person or entity, who alone or with others, determines how personal data is, or will be, processed. Who is a Data ProcessorA natural or legal person or entity charged with the processing of personal data on behalf of a data controller. 

For the purposes of data you collected using ShortStack, you would be considered the data controller and ShortStack is the data processor. There may be other cases when you are working with individuals’ personal data in which case you would be the data processor. Individuals or businesses not located within the EU, but who are considered processors or controllers of the personal data of individuals located in the EU;. Individuals and businesses located in countries whose data protection laws are set to change alongside the GDPR – examples include the United Kingdom’s proposed Data Protection Bill, Switzerland’s updates to the Swiss Data Protection Act, and Norway’s new Personal Data Act;. You must provide individuals with information regarding how their data will be used. 

Under the GDPR, you are considered a Data Controller, while ShortStack is the Data Processor. For the most part, the GDPR only affects folks located within Europe or those processing the personal data of individuals located within Europe. While staying compliant with the GDPR is important if you are located within the EU or processing the personal data of individuals located in the EU, when you use ShortStack, it isn’t difficult to comply with the requirements. 

Keywords: [“Data”,”email”,”individual”]
Source: https://www.shortstack.com/blog/gdpr-compliance-its-easier-than-you-think/

GDPR News Center News for 10-06-2018

GDPR compliance deadline is approaching: 10 things to do right away

Under the GDPR and other data protection and privacy laws, personal data should be treated as the most precious asset owned by the enterprise. Businesses should hold training sessions to explain the details of GDPR compliance to make sure every employee is aware of their role in protecting data throughout the organization. A typical GDPR policy will establish procedures and protocols limiting access to personal data, set consent standards, and provide for practical procedures regarding the data subject’s right to access and, if requested, delete their personal data. Besides creating a foundation for GDPR specifically, enterprises should also develop and implement a full set of policies regarding data security. Policies dealing with intrusion detection, data classification, privacy protection, password management, auditing and logging, and encryption, just to name a few, should all be developed in support of an overall GDPR compliance policy. 

One of the major provisions of the GDPR is the concept of acquiring clear consent to use personal data from the data subjects themselves. While the GDPR requires policies and procedures that establish enterprise-wide data security, there are also specific provisions of the regulation that require organizations to provide data subjects with access to their data. If your enterprise does not currently provide these mechanisms for all data subjects, it is not in compliance with the GDPR and is subject to fines and penalties. To establish compliance with the GDPR, enterprises should implement procedures that require these steps and retrain personnel to include data protection in all development processes. SEE: Hiring kit: GDPR data protection compliance officer. 

The GDPR requires enterprises to perform Data Protection Impact Assessments for any new processing or changes to processing deemed to represent a high risk to the privacy and protection of personal data. The documentation of this auditing procedure could reveal areas of data privacy and protection vulnerability and advance the enterprise toward the goal of GDPR compliance. 

Keywords: [“data”,”GDPR”,”enterprise”]
Source: https://www.techrepublic.com/article/gdpr-compliance-deadline-is-approaching-10-things-to-do-right-away/

Our GDPR Commitment

With massively destructive data breaches hitting companies and even governments on a seemingly regular basis, sophisticated uses of personal data, and our on-demand data-driven way of life – the ability to process data and keep it private is critical. To ensure SurveyGizmo is responsibly processing data, our customers will have 24/7/365 access to a standard Data Processing Addendum as it becomes available. Company-wide GDPR training will take place before the May 25 deadline, ensuring all Gizmos are familiar with the regulation and our ongoing commitment to protecting data. Our data center in Germany signifies our invested partnership with our European-based clients, and allows us to keep EU data within the EU, eliminating many risks associated with transcontinental data transfers. With some of the strictest data privacy laws in all of the EU, Germany was quickly decided to be the home of our EU Data Center. 

Customers can exercise all or any of their individual rights under GDPR. As a SurveyGizmo customer, you can request any or all of their GDPR individual rights on your data through multiple systems and processes – via phone, email, or through our main website. Individuals have the right to access their personal data and supplementary information. Individuals have the right to object to: Data processing based on legitimate interested or the performance of a task in the public interest/exercise of official authority; Direct marketing;and Data processing for purpose of scientific/historical research and statistics. A data controller is a person who determine the purposes for which and the manner in which any personal data are, or are to be processed. 

In relation to personal data, a data processor is any person who processes the data on behalf of the data controller. A subprocessor can process personal data on behalf of the data exporter and is often a third-party. Disclosure of the information or data by transmission, dissemination or otherwise making available, or Alignment, combination, blocking, erasure or destruction of the information or data. 

Keywords: [“data”,”individual”,”SurveyGizmo”]
Source: https://www.surveygizmo.com/resources/blog/gdpr-commitment

Our GDPR Commitment

With massively destructive data breaches hitting companies and even governments on a seemingly regular basis, sophisticated uses of personal data, and our on-demand data-driven way of life – the ability to process data and keep it private is critical. To ensure SurveyGizmo is responsibly processing data, our customers will have 24/7/365 access to a standard Data Processing Addendum as it becomes available. Company-wide GDPR training will take place before the May 25 deadline, ensuring all Gizmos are familiar with the regulation and our ongoing commitment to protecting data. Our data center in Germany signifies our invested partnership with our European-based clients, and allows us to keep EU data within the EU, eliminating many risks associated with transcontinental data transfers. With some of the strictest data privacy laws in all of the EU, Germany was quickly decided to be the home of our EU Data Center. 

Customers can exercise all or any of their individual rights under GDPR. As a SurveyGizmo customer, you can request any or all of their GDPR individual rights on your data through multiple systems and processes – via phone, email, or through our main website. Individuals have the right to access their personal data and supplementary information. Individuals have the right to object to: Data processing based on legitimate interested or the performance of a task in the public interest/exercise of official authority; Direct marketing;and Data processing for purpose of scientific/historical research and statistics. A data controller is a person who determine the purposes for which and the manner in which any personal data are, or are to be processed. 

In relation to personal data, a data processor is any person who processes the data on behalf of the data controller. A subprocessor can process personal data on behalf of the data exporter and is often a third-party. Disclosure of the information or data by transmission, dissemination or otherwise making available, or Alignment, combination, blocking, erasure or destruction of the information or data. 

Keywords: [“data”,”individual”,”SurveyGizmo”]
Source: https://www.surveygizmo.com/resources/blog/gdpr-commitment

GDPR News Center News for 08-29-2018

IDC GDPR Hands-on Workshop

About IDC. International Data Corporation is the premier global provider of market intelligence, advisory services, and events for the information technology, telecommunications, and consumer technology markets. With more than 1,100 analysts worldwide, IDC offers global, regional, and local expertise on technology and industry opportunities and trends in over 110 countries. IDC’s analysis and insight helps IT professionals, business executives, and the investment community to make fact-based technology decisions and to achieve their key business objectives. Founded in 1964, IDC is a wholly-owned subsidiary of International Data Group, the world’s leading media, data and marketing services company. 

Keywords: [“technology”,”IDC”,”Data”]
Source: https://www.idc.com/cee/events/65322-idc-gdpr-hands-on-workshop

Varonis Systems

Identifying GDPR data is the first step in preparing for the upcoming EU GDPR. With Varonis, you can automatically identify both country-specific and general patterns: country-specific patterns include Na.tional Identification Numbers, Vehicle ID information, Telephone numbers, Banking data, and more. Generic patterns include credit card numbers, IP addresses, even blood type. Once identified, you can generate reports on GDPR applicable data: including permissions, open access, and stale data. Classifications will help you meet GDPR head-on, building out security policy to monitor and alert on GDPR affected data. 

Get a personalized demo on how we help with GDPR with our expert team. 

Keywords: [“GDPR”,”data”,”Numbers”]
Source: https://www.varonis.com/products/gdpr-software

Fix it Fast

Fix it Fast will help you to implement the key requirements of GDPR. It contains templates, outlines, examples and plain-English explanations to help you to:Complete your data inventory so you know where all your data is. Draft and institute a Privacy Impact Assessment process. This book’s 10 Simple Steps will take you from beginning to end of your GDPR readiness and implementation project. This isn’t a legal book – it’s a practical, no-nonsense guide to getting the job done fast. 

This book helps is built for compliance officers, lawyers, information technology and information security professionals, and anyone else tasked with GDPR compliance to complete the critical tasks. 

Keywords: [“book”,”GDPR”,”help”]
Source: http://www.gdprfixitfast.com

GDPR Resource Centre

Peter oversees Bullhorn’s international operations outside North America in his role as Executive Vice President. Peter joined Bullhorn in 2009 and was responsible for its highly successful UK launch and continued expansion internationally. Peter has grown the international team to over 100 staff, established Bullhorn as the UK’s market leading recruitment software and has expanded Bullhorn’s reach into EMEA and APAC, achieving a user base of more than 30,000 international users. Prior to taking on the launch of Bullhorn International, Peter spent 20 years working in the recruitment industry and held a number of senior director roles before moving into the technology space. 

Keywords: [“Bullhorn”,”international”,”Peter”]
Source: https://www.bullhorn.com/uk/gdpr

GDPR Compliance

The European Union’s General Data Privacy Protection regulation institutes wide-sweeping changes to data privacy for any business collecting and processing data on EU citizens, residents, and visitors. It gives data subjects greater rights and control over their personal information and requires that businesses meet stringent data privacy protection measures as outlined in the GDPR. The GDPR goes into effect May 25, 2018 and businesses found in non-compliance face a fine of up to €20 million or 4 percent of annual revenue, whichever is greater. If you have not yet begun your GDPR compliance process, Imperva can help you meet key security requirements. 

Keywords: [“Data”,”GDPR”,”Privacy”]
Source: https://www.imperva.com/solutions/compliance

FuseMail

FuseMail, as part of the j2 Global group, is taking all necessary steps to comply with the GDPR, including engaging key stakeholders across our company to assess impact of the GDPR on our customers and actively evaluating our internal controls and procedures to identify any changes that need to be implemented in order to comply with the GDPR by the May 25, 2018 deadline. FuseMail will also be incorporating language into existing and new contracts and updating our privacy policies to provide additional assurance that we have appropriate legal mechanisms and safeguards in place to securely process and transfer personal data in relation to the services we provide. 

Keywords: [“GDPR”,”provide”,”comply”]
Source: https://fusemail.com/gdpr

QuickBooks and GDPR

GDPR will regulate the processing of personal data about EU individuals. This means the collection, storage, transfer or use of data, including the tracking of online activities. It doesn’t matter where the companies processing the personal data are based – if the information relates to an EU individual, it will be subject to the new law. Under GDPR, ‘personal data’ means any data that relates to an identified or identifiable individual, which includes things like your name, your home address, or a government-issued identification number. It does not include non-personal data, such a company registration number, a general corporate email alias or anonymised data. 

Keywords: [“data”,”include”,”individual”]
Source: https://quickbooks.intuit.com/uk/gdpr

GDPR Transparency and Consent Framework – IAB Tech Lab

IAB Europe and IAB Tech Lab have released the technical specifications for the GDPR Transparency & Consent Framework. The specifications will be maintained by a working group of the IAB Tech Lab going forward, in a collaboration between IAB Europe and IAB Tech Lab that leverages IAB Europe’s policy and legal expertise and IAB Tech Lab’s technical expertise. GDPR Transparency & Consent Framework – Cookie and Vendor List Format v1.0a. The following drafts are in public comment for 30 days until June 1, 2018 – however you are invited to adopt the pubvendors. Json technology as a beta implementation, even before the specifications are finalized. 

Keywords: [“IAB”,”Lab”,”Tech”]
Source: https://iabtechlab.com/standards/gdpr-transparency-and-consent…

GDPR News Center News for 03-04-2018

General Data Protection Regulation Resources

Personal data means information that relates to an identified or identifiable natural person. An individual’s name, job title, telephone number, or employee identification number is personal data. Worker For purposes of this GDPR tool, “Worker” refers to any individual who falls under the responsibility of your organization’s HR department, for example: applicants; employees; independent contractors; interns; temporary workers; and volunteers. The United Kingdom is expected to continue to be a member of the EEA into 2019. Switzerland is not a member of the EEA. .

Keywords: [“Worker”,”data”,”Personal”]
Source: https://www.littler.com/gdpr-resources

GDPR

As of 2018, every organization that does business in the EU will have to meet new data protection rules, or pay a steep fine. Compliance requires precise knowledge of the data you store and process, and the right data management policy across your organization. Software AG equips you with the means to quickly set up the knowledge base and process framework you need for achieving compliance by the 2018 deadline by offering everything in one solution: business process analysis, enterprise architecture management, IT portfolio management and planning, and GRC practices.

Keywords: [“data”,”process”,”management”]
Source: https://www.softwareag.com/us/innovation/gdpr/default.html

GDPR ‘fake news’| Cordery

Cordery is a trading name of Cordery Compliance Limited. Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. Company number 07931532 registered in England and Wales. Cordery Compliance Limited trading as Cordery provides some products and services which are not regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority; we will clearly state this to you if this is the case. We use the word “Partner” to refer to a shareowner or director of the company, or an employee or consultant who is a lawyer with equivalent standing and qualifications.

Keywords: [“Cordery”,”Limited”,”Compliance”]
Source: http://www.corderycompliance.com/gdpr-fake-news

GDPR Compliance Through Software Automation

The adoption by the European Parliament of the General Data Protection Regulation has profound repercussions for digital privacy on both sides of the Atlantic. It forces under threat of penalties that can reach 4% of global revenue to think more like data custodians and less like data owners in the collection, processing and disposition of personal information. BigID is the first software product to answer the requirements for GDPR head-on including automation for data subject rights, consent tracking, data PIAs and breach management.

Keywords: [“Data”]
Source: https://bigid.com/gdpr-compliance

GDPR Newsletter

GDPR will bring data protection legislation up-to-date with the way data is used and stored becomes law from 25 May 2018. There will be heavy fines for non-compliance, of up to €20m, or 4% of global annual turnover. Whilst many businesses are now at least aware of GDPR, far less have a plan as to how they will tackle the new law for either their existing data or an ongoing basis. With the deadline for compliance looming the time to act is now! Sign-up to our free newsletter to receive regular updates on GDPR and future GDPR events.

Keywords: [“GDPR”,”data”,”law”]
Source: https://www.ebcgroup.co.uk/gdpr-newsletter

Preparing for GDPR

The EU General Data Protection Regulation is the most stringent data protection and privacy regulation of its kind in the world. Every organization – no matter where in the world it is based – that holds or processes information that can directly or indirectly identify an EU resident is subject to GDPR. GDPR compliance is required by May 25, 2018, and penalties for non-compliance can be up to 4% of your company’s global revenue. If data protection and privacy weren’t already a boardroom discussion, they are now.

Keywords: [“Data”,”Protection”,”Regulation”]
Source: https://www.intellinet.com/gdpr

Bromsgrove, Worcester, Birmingham

The GDPR regulates the “Processing,” which includes the collection, storage, transfer or use, of personal data about EU individuals. Any organisation that processes personal data of EU individuals, including tracking their online activities, is within the scope of the law, regardless of whether the organisation has a physical presence in the EU. Importantly, under the GDPR, the concept of “Personal data” is very broad and covers any information relating to an identified or identifiable individual.

Keywords: [“individual”,”personal”,”data”]
Source: https://www.atg-it.co.uk/services/consultancy/gdpr

Your Path to Compliance

GDPR enforcement begins on May 25, 2018.The penalties for GDPR noncompliance can be enormous – fines up to €20 million or four percent of total worldwide revenue the previous year, whichever is greater. If you equip your organization with the right information with which to create a winning compliance strategy, you can steer wide of these penalties and their associated fallout. To that end, here is a collection of resources designed to help your organization successfully tackle GDPR..

Keywords: [“GDPR”,”penalties”,”organization”]
Source: http://www.guidancesoftware.com/gdpr

General Data Protection Regulation

The GDPR is a forthcoming regulation that forces EU businesses and organisations to implement security procedures so that data is protected for customers as well as employees. If you are not compliant by the deadline of 25th May 2018, organisations could face a fine of up to €20m or 4% global turnover. As stated in article 32 – Security of processing: “Implement appropriate technical and organisational measures to ensure a level of security appropriate to the risk including encryption of personal data”.

Keywords: [“security”,”appropriate”,”implement”]
Source: https://www.managedencryption.co.uk/gdpr

GDPR Compliant Secure File Transfer

If your business collects, stores, processes or transmits the personal data of EU residents, the General Data Protection Regulation will apply to you. One of, if not the, most far reaching data protection regulations in the world, fines for non-compliance are likely to be severe. With this much at stake, it is best practice to assure the systems, user authentication and encryption techniques involved in the external transmission of personal data are secure and compliant with GDPR..

Keywords: [“data”,”Regulation”,”personal”]
Source: https://www.ipswitch.com/solutions/gdpr-compliance